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Complete Illustrated Guide to Turning by Richard Raffan - Free PDF

The wood lathe is one of the oldest means of mass production, along with the potter’s wheel and metal casting. Round wooden objects so pervade our daily lives that we tend to forget that all those variations on spindles and knobs are turned.

Most turnery is now mass produced on automatic copy lathes, but almost within living memory most was done by hand on man-powered machines. In the 17th century, mechanically minded European aristocrats became the first hobby turners, working on lathes that cost more than most families earned in a year. And although small inexpensive hobby lathes were marketed through the great mail order catalogs of the early 20th century, it was not until the mid-1970s that woodturning started to become a popular retirement hobby.

Since the mid-1970s, interest in woodturning has increased exponentially and been transformed by a new breed of professional studio woodturner who creates one off objects rather than mass producing just a few standard items. In the 21st century, lathe-based art is working its way into art galleries. 

Much of the attraction of woodturning is the speed with which an object can be completed. Its very low establishment costs are also a factor, and the fact that raw material abounds often costing little more than your time to retrieve it. But a lathe only spins the wood.What is crafted from that spinning wood depends on the skill and vision of the individual at the lathe. This book can set you on the way to a new passion, and happy hours turning wood.

Complete Illustrated Guide to Turning by Richard Raffan - Free PDF

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Complete Illustrated Guide to Sharpening by Thomas Lie-Nielsen - Free PDF

 Sharpening common woodworking tools is not a difficult or complicated process. You don’t need a metallurgist’s understanding of steel, or serve a long apprenticeship, to produce durable, razor-sharp edges.Woodworkers will find a large selection of good tools and materials on the market, and the methods of getting the job done properly are usually straightforward. A bit of practice is necessary, but much less than it would take to perfect your golf swing.

Don't worry about ruining a blade. Steel tools are forgiving, and many of the mistakes you inevitably make in the beginning are easy to correct. A blade that has been over-heated and scorched on a bench grinder can be ground back, and a lopsided bevel can be straightened and squared. Even if your early attempts at sharpening a blade actually ruin it, you can always buy a new one. The experience you gain will be worth the price.

It is important first to learn the difference between a properly sharpened tool and a badly sharpened one. Shiny surfaces are not enough if the cutting edge is uneven or rounded over. A plane blade whose back is not flat will never be truly sharp even if it is polished to a mirror finish. Think of a razor blade -straight and sharp. Use a magnifying glass and good light so you can really see what you’re doing, and think in terms of simple geometry: the intersecting planes, lines an angles that produce a sharp working edge.

This book is not about turning sharpening into a hobby. Sharpening woodworking tools is a means to an end, and that end is woodworking. Your collection of sharpening tools and your work area should be arranged so it is convenient to use and designed to help you get accurate, predictable results in a minimum amount of time. If you succeed in doing that, you will be encouraged to sharpen often and not avoid it as people often do. 

An inevitable question is just how sharp a blade really needs to be. Competitors in planing exhibitions try to make the longest, thinnest shavings they can (usually in a cooperative species of wood). This is a fascinating exercise, but the point of knowing how to sharpen your woodworking tools is not to make specimen shavings but to accurately dimension and smooth wood. Honing a blade until it can remove a shaving of wood no more than one-thousandth of an inch thick is overkill when all you want to do is remove the high spots from a rough board with a scrub plane. On the other hand, if you’re trying to create a glassy smooth finish on hard maple with a handplane alone it will help to know how to prepare your blade. The trick is in knowing what kind of edge you really need. 

To that end, it is helpful to keep things simple, to focus on results, and not to worry too much about theory or opinion. The best way to sharpen is the way that works for you.

Complete Illustrated Guide to Sharpening by Thomas Lie-Nielsen - Free PDF

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Complete Illustrated Guide to Shaping Wood by Lonnie Bird - Free PDF

Shape is a fundamental of design. All furniture styles, even seemingly simple designs such as Shaker, use shape to enhance, increase function, and define style. For example, the sensuous curve of a chair back adds comfort as well as visual appeal, and the slender taper of a table leg creates lightness without sacrificing strength. Shape is critical to the ultimate success or failure of a piece of furniture. It simply can't be ignored. 

Before shapes can be created, they must first be visualized and then drawn. There are tools and templates available for drawing geometric shapes; but organic, free form curves are often best sketched freehand. Fortunately, the natural movements of the wrist and elbow make it possible for anyone to draw flowing curves with a bit of practice. As illustrated in this book, the choices available for shaping are numerous. And it's not necessary to have access to a shop full of power tools, either. Many woodworkers are rediscovering hand tools along with the pleasure and satisfaction that comes with their use. Planes, saws, chisels, and other edge tools all require patience and a degree of skill; but they yield a handmade look and texture as well as a deep sense of accomplishment.

Learning to tune and effectively use power tools can be satisfying, too. And many power tool techniques, such as template shaping, yield efficiency that is unmatched with hand tools. Machines are also a good choice for many labor-intensive tasks, such as planing and sawing stock to size, providing more time for creating details by hand that machines simply can't duplicate. For example, a bandsaw is an efficient choice for sawing a curve in preparation for refining and sculpting the same curve with a spoke-shave and a rasp. 

Complete Illustrated Guide to Shaping Wood by Lonnie Bird - Free PDF

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Complete Illustrated Guide to Period Furniture Details by Lonnie Bird - Free PDF

Furniture from 18th-century America continues to be among the most popular styles of all time. While other forms of furniture come into style and soon appear dated, period furniture continues as a best-selling classic. And for good reason-period furniture is rich with detail. It was produced during a time when there was a broad separation between classes of people. 

Those with means, just as with people today, sought ways to display their wealth and status in society. One of the primary ways to display opulence in the eighteenth century was through finely crafted furniture. In large, wealthy cities, such as Philadelphia, Boston, and Newport, Rhode Island, furniture makers crafted highly developed furniture art forms. Embellishment became the norm as artisans pierced, carved, sculpted, inlaid, and gilded what is recognized today as some of the finest examples of furniture ever produced. 

As you study, draw, and reproduce these classic examples of Americana, you can't help but to be immensely impressed with the period craftsman's sense of design and proportion, as well as his tremendous skill with a few relatively simple tools. 

As a woodworker, if you're not accustomed to using hand tools, then I encourage you to begin by accumulating the essential edge tools such as planes, chisels, and a dovetail saw and enjoying learning to use them. Furniture produced entirely with machines is void of the fine details that define period furniture. Quite simply, machines for all their sophistication can't duplicate what's created by a trained eye and a skillful hand. In other words, while it is acceptable and desirable to use machines to saw curves, shape moldings, and even cut some types ofjoints, hand tools are still required for many of the details. In the process you'll experience the delight of cutting a dovetail by hand and hearing the unique sound of a sharp plane as it slices the surface of a board.

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Complete Illustrated Guide to Joinery by Gary Rogowski - Free PDF

We categorize our furniture making like we do so many of our other human endeavors. There are only so many ways to make a box after all. But we have in our imaginative way, made the most of all the possibilities. The fact is, there are only two basic joinery systems. Either we use box construction,
joining wide panels of solid-wood or plywood materials together, to make our car-cases, cabinets, or jewelry boxes. Or we use frame construction to build our chairs, tables, beds, and cabinets. These frames use smaller members fastened together with or without a panel captured within them.

From these two categories spring a wealth of joinery options. A project as simple as a box has a dozen ways to solve the joinery question, and many joints can be used interchangeably. So how do you choose which joint to use?

The function of the piece is the starting point for your joinery choices. Are you building a cabinet to old the crown jewels or a recipe box destined to be stained with the labors of the kitchen? Dovetail joints are the best way to join large panels, but a window box doesn’t need dovetails to be serviceable. Next, consider economy -the need for efficiency and speed in your building.

What’s your time frame? If it’s a weekend project, your choice of a joint will make a big difference. Hand chopping dozens of mortises is certainly not time-efficient, but it may be the perfect way to enjoy working at a leisurely pace in a harried world. The skill you bring to a project also determines which joint you choose, but learning a new method of joinery is a wonderful challenge. We tend to find our methods and stick to them; but remember that each time you cut a joint, you get a little better at doing it. 

Joinery affects the design in ways both obvious and quite subtle. That simple box can be built in a dozen ways, but a mitered corner doesn’t look anything like one that’s finger jointed together. Joinery will also help in the building of some pieces, offering shoulders and edges that help hold a piece together for gluing or pre-assembly work. Make your joinery choices based on all these factors. One method may work better one day and another method the next. 

Please also remember that this book is only a guide. No one process, jig, machine, or book can confer mastery. The way to mastering joinery is to make joints. It’s the time you spend learning, making mistakes, backing up, and starting all over again. The time you spend in the shop is the real pay-off; the furniture you build a wonderful bonus.

Complete Illustrated Guide to Joinery by Gary Rogowski - Free PDF

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Complete Illustrated Guide to Jigs and Fixtures by Sandor Nagyszalanczy - Free PDF

Before you can begin building your own jigs and fixtures, you need to know what to build and how to build it. A good way to start is to explore basics of jig design, appropriate materials and hardware, and good construction practices. Whether you plan to build jigs exactly as shown in this book or design your own customized devices, you’ll benefit from learning the functional approach to what jigs do, and how to go about choosing or creating jigs that suit your tools and particular work style. Once you’ve nailed down a design, you must choose from a wide assortment of wood and synthetic materials and hardware (fasteners, fittings, extrusions, etc.) to make a jig that’s accurate and functional. Finally, you must employ good construction practices to make your jig sturdy and durable. You’ll accomplish that by using strong joinery and solid woodworking practices, along with a few tricks gleaned from the machinist’s trade.

Finding an effective jig or fixture for a woodworking operation can be as elusive and time-consuming as designing a great piece of furniture, a sailboat, or a ukulele. It takes solid woodworking knowledge and some problem-solving skills, with a good dose of inspiration thrown in. Even a moderately complex setup can pose numerous choices:
  • What tool or machine is best for the operation? 
  • Should the jig move the wood over the machine or guide the machine past the wood? 
  • How does the workpiece need to be referenced and clamped?
  • Should the jig be adjustable? 
Most of the woodworkers delight in solving challenging jigging problems. But tackling these problems requires a basic understanding of jig function and design. Generally speaking, jigs are the devices that help us cut, shape, drill, and sand parts quickly and accurately, while fixtures are devices that hold parts firmly during machining and assembly (see the photo on the facing page). Used separately or together, these essential woodworking aids help us do everyday tasks like cutting boards to accurate length and width, as well as complex operations like pattern routing parts or sawing three-dimensional shapes.While we all own at least a few commercially made jigs (miter gauges, router edge guides, etc.), most woodworkers create their own jigs. In this section, we’ll examine the function of jigs and fixtures and how they help us perform woodworking tasks more easily, accurately, and safely.We’ll also explore some factors to consider when choosing the best jig for a particular job, as well as how to customize jigs to better suit your needs.

Complete Illustrated Guide to Jigs and Fixtures by Sandor Nagyszalanczy

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Complete Illustrated Guide to Furniture and Cabinet Construction by Andy Rae - Free PDF

Making furniture is one of the most satisfying ways to pass time: The schiiick of a plane iron on wood; the dizzying aroma of freshly sawn sugar pine or East Indian rosewood; the endless array of color, texture, and feel of woods from around the world; the tense but joyful final assembly, when all work and toil come together in a conclusive burst of completion. What excitement! This is the fine -and fun- art of woodworking. The reward is beautiful furniture.

To experience this excitement, you’ll need to have a degree of control over your work and your tools, command a working knowledge of your materials, and understand some basic design principles. Unlike most other crafts, furniture making and cabinetmaking demand vast knowledge -and attentiveness. You must know what tools and techniques to use and how to arrange the correct sequence, or order, of events when using them. You should listen with attentive ears and eyes to the material you’re working and choose wood wisely, allowing for its eccentricities. With its countless pieces and parts, cabinetmaking involves a high level of organization, and organizing your work and your shop space are part and parcel of the craft. By combining all your skills, you can make any type of furniture your dreams conjure up. You’re limited only by your imagination. I hope this book will provide you with a starting point for these skills. With practice, many small joys are waiting for you. They’re worth seeking.

Above all, be patient. It takes time to master some of the smallest things. There are tricks and shortcuts, of course. They come with experience, and many are shown in the pages ahead. More important is the awareness that comes from trying many approaches and finding one that works for you. In a very real sense, woodworking is a personal journey. That’s because there is no right or wrong way of making furniture. What counts is what works. Once you discover something that works, call it your own, and stand by it. You’ll have found something that will make your woodworking more pleasurable. And your fine furniture will reflect the results.

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Complete Illustrated Guide to Finishing by Jeff Jewwit - Free PDF

Finishing. It's the aptly named final detail of making furniture. Finishes not only protect wood from stains, water damage, and other mishaps, they also make it look richer and deeper and add dimension and luster. Whether you get a tingly feeling from wiping a coat of oil or shellac on highly figured curly maple or excitement from matching an old finish, you will find finishing is one of the rewards of making things from wood.

This book will guide you through the finishing process and make it as exciting for you as. You will see that almost 30 percent of this book is devoted to surface preparation, techniques not often shown or elaborated on in other finishing books. Proper surface preparation is what makes great finishes heads above others. Then we;ll move on to coloring, which is where most finishing problems arise. A full chapter will be devoted to troubleshooting and overcoming staining problems. From there we'll lool at how to choose a finish by its physics and chemistry, as well as aesthetic qualities. We'll finally get to applying clear finish, and you will learn how to French polish, spray lacquers, and work with water-based products.

Complete Illustrated Guide to Finishing by Jeff Jewwit - Free PDF

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The Art of Woodworking with 40 Project Plans - Free PDF

When you craft something from wood, the process not only teaches you new skills and provides a creative outlet. it can generate an heirloom. Or at least an object that is rich with sentimental value. This book is a teacher of skills and source of ideas. It is about the process and the project.

In this book you will find all of the information and project plans you need to develop a hobby that will last a lifetime. It contains great advice on setting up your own workshop and some essential background information you will need to know about wood. It takes you through all the basic skills in the order you will need them including measuring, marking, and layout, then using cutting and shaping tools to create solid wood joints. With clear photos it shows you exactly how to clamp and glue your joints, then offers a complete section on sanding and finishing for professional results.

The Art of Woodworking with 40 Project Plans - Free PDF

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Build Your Own Kitchen Cabinets by Danny Proulx - Free PDF

Kitchen cabinetmaking, like many other skills, requires nothing more than attention to detail and patience. It is a skill that is learned and improved upon with practice and well within the scope of most do-it-yourselfers.

The kitchen cabinetmaking style detailed in this book is a simple, straightforward style used by many cabinet manufacturers, with some minor variations. However, common dimensions such as cabinet depth, height, and width, as well as the industry standard door sizes, govern the limits of those variations. This building style was adapted from many sources. Primarily, it is a blend of the best features of European and North American style cabinetry.

Build Your Own Kitchen Cabinets by Danny Proulx - Free PDF

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Federal Furniture by Michael Dunbar - Free PDF

The waning years of the 18th Century marked an exhilarating period in American history. With the end of the Revolutionary War in 1781 and the ratification of the U.U. Constitution in 1788, Americans embarked on one of the most radical political experiments in history. The product of their struggle was the Federal Republic -an achievement of which they were acutely proud. At the same time they were also unknowingly laying the groundwork in America for what would begin in England and spread elsewhere as another of history's greatest changes the Industrial Revolution.

The arts of America bear the influence of this exciting era, and many innovations in style heralded the republic's birth. In furniture, the emerging style in America was known as Federal and was produced roughly from around 1790 to 1820.


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Basic Cabinetmaking by Mark Duginske - Free PDF

Every year professional and amateur woodworkers build thousands of cabinets. One of the biggest misconceptions about building cabinets is that you need a shop full of expensive machinery to achieve professional results. On the contrary, cabinets are actually quite simple constructions that with a few well-designed tools can be very easy to build.

This booklet is designed to act as a primer to get you started in cabinetmaking. Rather than offering a lot of theory we strive to teach you cabinetmaking by example.


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The Art of Woodworking: Woodworking Machines - Free PDF

Whether you are working with milled boards from lumberyard, old barn siding or sheets of 4-by-8 plywood, the table saw is an excellent all around tool for cutting wood to width (ripping) and length (crosscutting). If the table saw were used for nothing but there two cuts, it would still be a valuable tool. But the saw also accepts a wide variety of blades and accessories, from roller stands that assist with unwieldy panels to molding heads capable of producing elaborate decorative trim. And with help from the simple, inexpensive shop-made jigs featured in this book, the table saw is also unsurpassed for repeat cuts and also valuable for making such fundamental woodworking joints as the lap, box and open mortise-and-tenon joints.


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The Art of Woodworking: Wooden Toys and Crafts - Free PDF

Most of requirements for building furniture -functional designs, proper tool setups and techniques, and safe work habits- are also crucial to making toys and crafts. But wooden toys, because they are intended for use by children, involve other considerations. Foremost among these is safety. Toys intended for infants and toddlers have to be large enough that they cannot be swallowed and lodge in a child's windpipe. And since children explore as much with their mouths as with their hands, the wood species you use for your project and the finish you apply -whether paint or a clear finish- must be non-toxic.


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The Art of Woodworking: Wood Finishing - Free PDF

Finishing can be a dangerous business if you are not well informed and properly prepared. From wood fillers to waxes, polyurethane varnishes and tung oil, finishing product frequently depend on toxic organic solvents to do their work. Without the proper safety gear and precautions, short-term exposure to these solvents can result in irritation to the skin, eyes, and throat, as well as dizziness, headache, nausea, and shortness of breath. Longer-term exposure poses more potential risk; some effects may not be apparent until you have used the substances for months or even years.


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The Art of Woodworking: Wood Turning - Free PDF

The wood lathe is perhaps the oldest of all woodworking machines. Primitive forms of this tool were used by the Etruscan in the 9th Century BC. And throughout its long history, the tool has been used in virtually the same way. Somewhat like a potter's wheel laid on its side, the lathe spins a wood blank while a turner shapes the wood with chisel-like tools. The lathe makes it possible to shape wood into flowing, rounded forms in a way that other tools cannot.


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The Art of Woodworking: Wood Carving - Free PDF

The tools of the carving trade, laid out in their entirely, may at first seem overwhelming to the novice, for variety and choice is immense. However -and fortunately for the beginner- few tools are needed to start carving. Even professional wood carvers with hundreds of tools at their disposal, perform the majority of their work with a dozen or so tools. The three fundamental types of carving tool are chisel, which has a straight blade; the gouge, which has a curved blade; and the knife. Additional tools that are frequently used include draw knives and scorps, which are essentially curved draw-knives that greatly ease the creation of concave forms.


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The Art of Woodworking: Tables and Desks - Free PDF

Although the following chapters of this book focus on the nuts and bolts of table and desk construction, there is more to building a piece of furniture than cutting joints and assembling components. Before any of this can happen, some time must be spent designing the piece, and selecting and preparing the lumber. This book focuses on the skills you will need to carry out these preparatory steps. For some craftsmen, the preliminaries are among the most enjoyable aspects of a project. Hand picking a mahogany board at the lumberyard, or unwrapping a package of exotic wood from a mail-order supplier, for example, can be rewarding experiences.


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The Art of Woodworking: Shop-Made Jigs and Fixtures - Free PDF

Since its invention early in the 20th Century, the router has become one of the most popular portable power tools -and with good reason. Few tools can match its speed, accuracy, and versatility for shaping wood or cutting joints. But jigs are almost a necessity; although the router can be used freehand, most cuts require a guide -particularly repeat cuts.


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The Art of Woodworking: Sharpening and Tool Care - Free PDF

At one time or another, virtually every woodworker has looked upon tool sharpening as rainy day task, an onerous duty undertaken only as a last resort that seems calculated to delay progress on the moment's favorite project. Although it may be impossible to persuade all woodworkers to embrace the joys of tool sharpening -as some do- sooner or later, most adopt an attitude of enlightened self interest, an understanding that regular attention to tool condition will speed, rather than retard, progress and improve both the quality of work and enjoyment of it.


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BUILD Your Own FURNITURE and WOOD CRAFTS Easily

Save thousands of dollars by easily making your own high-end wood furniture and other small crafts. This product can guide you to build thousands products of furniture and wood crafts. You will get instant access to over 9,000 woodworking plans for furniture and wood crafts! Great idea to have woodworking plans to start a business.

With an easy to search catalog, complete blueprints, material lists and full color instructions for all types of home furniture and crafts!

BUILD Your Own FURNITURE and WOOD CRAFTS Easily

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The Art of Woodworking: Shaker Furniture - Free PDF

The shaker are recognized today as one of America's most interesting communal religious societies. Thanks to the vigorous crop of books, articles, and exhibitions that have sprouted up since the Shaker's bicentennial celebration in 1974, most people think of them first and foremost as producers of simple and well-made furniture. But in their heyday from 1825 to 1845, they were better known for their original blend of celibacy and communalism, a deep commitment to Christian principles as practices by Christ's disciples, and a worship service unique in civilized America for its group dancing, a sort of sacred line or circle dance that gave all members equal opportunity to express the Holy Spirit.


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The Art of Woodworking: Routing and Shaping - Free PDF

Since its invention during the First World War, the portable electric router has made its presence felt in every aspect of woodworking. It is easy to see why: the router can cut rabbets, trim laminate, bevel edges, shape molding, and make dovetail joints. It can even surface small pieces of stock and follow a pre-cut template to cut intricate patterns. The sheer number of tasks it performs easily ranks the router with any other portable or stationary woodworking tools. It is as close to a universal tool as woodworking has. 


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The Art of Woodworking: Restoring Antiques - Free PDF

Restoring antiques is a rewarding and economical way to fill a home with furniture, but for many restorers, the process leads to a deeper experience, of forging links to the past. Whether firming up a wobbly joint or uncovering the natural wood grain under multiple layers of paint, returning a piece of timeworn furniture to its original condition is like traveling back in time to discover the methods of a woodworker from another generation. You can appreciate the skill used -and perhaps learn from any mistakes the builder made.


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The Art of Woodworking: Portable Power Tools - Free PDF

Traditionally thought of as only a carpenter's tool, the circular saw has earned an important place in the woodworking shop. It is the ideal cutting tool for reducing large panels or long boards to a manageable size. Accordingly, the circular saw is often the first tool woodworkers reach for when they are working with heavy or unwieldy stock.


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The Art of Woodworking: Outdoor Furniture - Free PDF

By the nature of where it spends its life, outdoor furniture has to be designed, first and foremost, to withstand its toughest enemy -the elements. While makers of indoor furniture need to consider the swelling and contraction of wood due to seasonal changes in relative humidity, outdoor furniture builders must also allow for the fact that their pieces will occasionally be drenched in water, dried by the wind, and baked by the sun. With appropriate materials, design, joinery, and hardware, you can fashion pieces that will be as durable and longlasting as any kitchen side chair or bedroom armoire.


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The Art of Woodworking: Master Woodworker - Free PDF

In an era of kiln-dried lumber and power tools, working freshly cut wood seems more than a little whimsical -a throwback to a bygone era when itinerant wood carvers, turners, and chair makers would travel from town to town, sizing up the trees and the local demand for hayforks, barrels, bowls, chairs, shingles, and baskets. In England in the late 19th Century, craftsmen known as chair bodgers would set up shop just outside town. The surrounding trees provided the bodger with all the raw materials for his mill, shop, and home. Starting with a minimal tool kit, he could fashion many of the other tools necessary to fell, split, and shape local trees.

Today, revivalist movement in England and North America have discovered the simple, elegant tradition of green woodworking. Yet there is more to working green wood than simple nostalgia; there are number of good reasons to work with wood from freshly felled trees. Because the wood is swollen with moisture, it splits, cleaves, and bends more easily than dried wood.


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The Art of Woodworking: Kitchen Cabinets - Free PDF

Despite the tremendous variety of kitchen cabinets, they all come down to two basic types: face frame and frameless. Each has characteristics that greatly affect how the heart of modern home will appear and function. For the designer, cabinetmaker, and installer, they also determine how the cabinets will be created.

Face frame cabinets are the most popular type of kitchen cabinet in North America. This time-honored method of construction involves attaching a framework of solid lumber to the front of a carcase. Doors and drawers can be mounted in one of three ways: inset, lipped, or overlay.


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The Art of Woodworking: Home Workshop - Free PDF

For most woodworkers, the home workshop is a peaceful refuge, where craft gives shape to creative ideas. It is also the place where accidents may occur, owing to the very nature of the activity. But the likelihood of mishap can be reduced by a few simple precautions. First, an informed woodworker is a safe woodworker. Read the owner's manual supplied with all your tools. Before starting a job, make sure you know how to use the safety accessories that are designed ti protect you from injury while working with a tool.

Most accidents are the result of carelessness or inattention -failure to use a safety guard when cutting a board on a table saw, face jointing stock with bare hands (rather than with a push block) or using a router without safety goggles.


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The Art of Woodworking: Handbook of Joinery - Free PDF

Like most common chairs, Windsors use socket construction -a round tenon that fits into a round hole. There is very little edge grain around the circumference of a hole to create a good glue joint. Because most of the circumference is end grain, a round tenon in a drilled hole is very poor joint that soon comes apart. Its only virtue is that it can be produced quickly and easily. To make it work some additional strengthening is required.


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The WOODWORKERS TREASURE CHEST

This product, titled "The Woodworkers Treasure Chest" will give you:

  • A comprehensive collection of thousands of verified plans, video tutorials and resources all in one convenient place
  • A proven system which methodically guides you along during your projects without overwhelming you with unnecessary information
  • The support of a passionate and dedicated like-minded woodworking community to continually encourage and inspire you even further and help you test your ideas before beginning your projects

The WOODWORKERS TREASURE CHEST


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The Art of Woodworking: Hand Tools - Free PDF

Every woodworking project begins with a single mark -a line describing the size and shape of the work's first piece. Inscribed accurately and followed skillfully, this measurement and others that follow will guide the woodcrafter unerringly toward successful completion of an object of beauty. But much is at stake: Inaccurate or erratic measurements can doom a noble design to the kindling box.

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The Art of Woodworking: Finish Carpentry - Free PDF

To the Greeks and Romans, proportion was in the design of everything they built. For visual appeal, their structures relied on a logical and harmonious progression of architectural elements, one atop the other, from plinth to cornice. Some 2000 years later, furniture makers of the Georgian period used small-scale versions of the same elements to decorate the interiors of their patrons' homes.


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The Art of Woodworking: Encyclopedia of Wood - Free PDF

Wood identification has come a long way since the turn of the century, when Yale was the only one school teaching forestry studies. Now there are 25-30 places where wood identification is offered as part of the curriculum.

There are literally hundreds of woods, some of them reasonably plentiful domestic species, that seldom find their way into lumberyards. Nevertheless, the are still outstanding woods for certain application.


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The Art of Woodworking: Classic American Furniture - Free PDF

The origin of Windsor is ancient history. Their antecedents can be attributed to the Egyptians, where tomb drawings of the 18th Dynasty depict workmen sitting on three-legged hand-hewn stools socketed to a plank seat. The reason for the name Windsor is something of an enigma, but the most logical explanation is that they were named during the first decade of the 18th Century after the English town of Windsor, whose beech trees provided a plentiful supply of raw material for legs and other turned parts.

Windsor chair making started as a cottage industry in England during 1720s, but soon became an important factory-based operation, employing hundreds of workers, centered in the town of High Wycombe. Although the first Windsor in America were chairs imported from England, Philadelphia chair makers almost immediately capitalized on this popular new form of easily made seating. Their one-man shops expanded into large factories.


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The Art of Woodworking: Cabinets and Bookcases - Free PDF

Case pieces -cupboards, bureaus, bookcases, chests, sideboards, and other assorted cabinets- are at best merely glorified boxes. Yet there is something special about them. All contain an element of mystery, just waiting to be explored. Who can resist opening a small door with a tiny knob and spinner, or lifting the lid of a dovetailed keepsake box?

To the cabinetmakers, case pieces are a pleasure, as well as a challenge to build. The possible layout combinations are endless: doors, drawers, shelves, pull-out trays, dividers, pigeonholes, and secret compartments. Nothing thrills a customer more than to be told that their new acquisition has a hidden compartment. And nothing adds to the anticipation more than to say it is up to them to find it.


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How to SET UP a COMPLETE SHOP on a Budget

The most common problems Beginner Woodworkers face are tool selection and workshop space, when it came to tools, people simply didn’t know what to get.

  • They were afraid of getting bad tools and wasting their hard earned money on something that would stop working within a year…
  • Or they were afraid of overspending and buying something that... when it came down to it… they would never even use.
  • They’re usually confused about which tools they need to have, and which ones they can do without. (After all, if you’ve looked inside a woodworking magazine lately, EVERY single tool is a MUST-HAVE item… even the ones that seem to have no practical purpose!)

So, you found yourself on those situations then you may need this one.


You can find on it:
  • Everything You Need To Setup Your Shop (no matter how tiny your space is!) - Hundreds of pages of pure no fluff, step-by-step, how to instructions, advice, strategies and resources to setup shop in any space for any budget.
  • Workshop "Perfect Layouts" - Tons of layouts from small to large spaces you can copy to maximize your work space and make your shop much more efficient.
  • Tool Selection + Price Guides + Secret Suppliers List: Discover WHAT tools you actually need and where to buy them at deep discounts. (Retailers will hate me for this!)
  • Free bonuses: "The Workshop Cheat List" & "Deal Alert Service". Discover how to cut enormous costs with lumber, tools and get alerts on discounted deals online.

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The Art of Woodworking: Cabinetmaking - Free PDF

The first step in any cabinetmaking project is to select and prepare your stock. Not all the wood at a lumberyard is free of defects, so it is important to choose boards carefully. Whether you are building an armoire or a toy box, most stock is readied in roughly the same way.


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The Art of Woodworking: Building Chairs - Free PDF

For millennia, chairs have been expected to exceed the seemingly simple demands of seating. Comfort, durability, and beauty are the criteria they must meet. The best provide a seamless blend of all three qualities. The worst can be bad indeed. Well-designed and properly built chairs provide comfortable and durable seating, are pleasing to look at, and fit into their surrounding. Small wonder that chair making is often considered to be the pinnacle of the wood worker's art.

By the time their became more widespread in Europe in the 16th Century, chairs had become stylized to serve specific purposes. Dining chairs were built to fit around dining tables, and writing chairs were often paired with desks. Often, neither was matched to the human form; comfort frequently took second place to the formal function. Traditional dining chairs, for example, feature a backrest at an almost 90ยบ angle to the seat, obliging the user to sit ramrod straight.


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BUILD Your Own FURNITURE and WOOD CRAFTS Easily

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